Gee Memorial Wall completed


The John Gee Memorial Wall was finished this week as part of a goodwill gesture by the new Speedway station. It was erected in rememberance of the house demolished on property which was once owned by Gee and suspected to have been constructed by him. The wall is reportedly constructed of bricks from the old home and reads, “John Gee (1798 - 1865) moved to Gallipolis, Ohio, as a young man and eventually became one of the community’s largest landowners. A skilled builder who constructed a number of buildings in Gallipolis, his success in the community is significant because he was an African American during the time of slavery. Gee used his financial resources to provide local African Americans with more opportunity and donated four acres of land to establish the Pine Street Colored Cemetery in 1860.”


Dean Wright | Daily Tribune

The John Gee Memorial Wall was finished this week as part of a goodwill gesture by the new Speedway station. It was erected in rememberance of the house demolished on property which was once owned by Gee and suspected to have been constructed by him. The wall is reportedly constructed of bricks from the old home and reads, “John Gee (1798 – 1865) moved to Gallipolis, Ohio, as a young man and eventually became one of the community’s largest landowners. A skilled builder who constructed a number of buildings in Gallipolis, his success in the community is significant because he was an African American during the time of slavery. Gee used his financial resources to provide local African Americans with more opportunity and donated four acres of land to establish the Pine Street Colored Cemetery in 1860.”

The John Gee Memorial Wall was finished this week as part of a goodwill gesture by the new Speedway station. It was erected in rememberance of the house demolished on property which was once owned by Gee and suspected to have been constructed by him. The wall is reportedly constructed of bricks from the old home and reads, “John Gee (1798 – 1865) moved to Gallipolis, Ohio, as a young man and eventually became one of the community’s largest landowners. A skilled builder who constructed a number of buildings in Gallipolis, his success in the community is significant because he was an African American during the time of slavery. Gee used his financial resources to provide local African Americans with more opportunity and donated four acres of land to establish the Pine Street Colored Cemetery in 1860.”
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_DSCN6047.jpgThe John Gee Memorial Wall was finished this week as part of a goodwill gesture by the new Speedway station. It was erected in rememberance of the house demolished on property which was once owned by Gee and suspected to have been constructed by him. The wall is reportedly constructed of bricks from the old home and reads, “John Gee (1798 – 1865) moved to Gallipolis, Ohio, as a young man and eventually became one of the community’s largest landowners. A skilled builder who constructed a number of buildings in Gallipolis, his success in the community is significant because he was an African American during the time of slavery. Gee used his financial resources to provide local African Americans with more opportunity and donated four acres of land to establish the Pine Street Colored Cemetery in 1860.” Dean Wright | Daily Tribune
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