Physicist, president take Chautauqua weekend stage


By Dean Wright - [email protected]



Susan Marie Frontczak portrays Marie Sklodwska Curie, a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity.


Courtesy photos

Chuck Chalberg portrays Theodore Roosevelt, often referred to as Teddy or TE. Chalberg’s Roosevelt introduces audiences to this “force of nature” who personifies the debate on wilderness preservation and making use of the resources of that same wilderness.


Courtesy photos

GALLIPOLIS — Ohio Chautauqua will be bringing Marie Curie, physicist, to its stage Friday evening and President Teddy Roosevelt to the stage Saturday.

Susan Frontczak will return to the stage Friday at 7:30 p.m. Friday in Gallipolis City Park as physicist Marie Curie and Chuck Chalberg will appear as Theodore Roosevelt Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

A special memorial will also be held Saturday in honor of local Ohio Chautauqua organizer and former Bob Evans Farms manager, the late Ray McKinniss.

Frontczak appeared on the stage Wednesday evening as “Frankenstein” author Mary Shelley.

According to Ohio Chautauqua information, “Dr. John C. ‘Chuck’ Chalberg is a professional historian who performs as a number of historical figures. When he is not writing for such publications as ‘Touchstone,” “The Weekly Standard” and “Gilbert,” among a few others, he has been known to become Theodore Roosevelt and baseball’s Branch Rickey. Chalberg has taught American history at the college level for many years. He has performed at various summer Chautauquas, colleges and conferences across the country.”

Marie Curie is known for enlightening modern science to the idea that radioactivity is an atomic property of chemical elements. She was a pioneer in research on radioactivity and the first woman to win the Nobel Prize. She would eventually win the prize again. Curie was part of a family legacy known for four other Nobel Prizes. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris.

Curie died at the age of 66 in 1934 from aplastic anemia that was attributed to radiation exposure carrying radium test tubes in her pockets. Despite her study into radioactivity, many regarded her as both physicist and chemist. She was the first woman in 1995 to be honored for her own merits in the Pantheon in Paris.

Curie was originally born in Poland, but eventually became a French citizen. She had two daughters.

As for U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, he may be best summed up in a brief description of his youth. Roosevelt had once created the Boone and Crocket Club. The goal of the organization was to preserve the wilderness as well as the ancient art of hunting.

A staunch preservationist and conservationist, Roosevelt was one of America’s more interesting presidents. Roosevelt succeeded President William McKinley after his assassination in 1901. Roosevelt was arguably the nation’s youngest president at the age of 42. He was credited with starting the National Forest Service, as well as setting aside land for about 150 national forests and national parks.

Dean Wright can be reached at (740) 446-2342, Ext. 2103.

Susan Marie Frontczak portrays Marie Sklodwska Curie, a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_Marie-Curie-5-.jpgSusan Marie Frontczak portrays Marie Sklodwska Curie, a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. Courtesy photos

Chuck Chalberg portrays Theodore Roosevelt, often referred to as Teddy or TE. Chalberg’s Roosevelt introduces audiences to this “force of nature” who personifies the debate on wilderness preservation and making use of the resources of that same wilderness.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_TR_0471.jpgChuck Chalberg portrays Theodore Roosevelt, often referred to as Teddy or TE. Chalberg’s Roosevelt introduces audiences to this “force of nature” who personifies the debate on wilderness preservation and making use of the resources of that same wilderness. Courtesy photos

By Dean Wright

[email protected]

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