Formerly emaciated dog finds home


By Dean Wright - [email protected]



Blossom says her last goodbyes to the Gallia County Canine Shelter before being shipped home to be with her new family.


GALLIPOLIS — Many people would agree that dogs have either the best or worst lives. There is no in-between.

They can be beaten and starved just as often they are unconditionally loved, do not have to work a day of their lives and spend warm afternoons lazing about the house.

According to Gallia County Dog Warden Laurie Cardillo, Blossom is a 3-year-old Mastiff and Mountain Kerr mix. Blossom finally experienced what it was like to be on the good side of life after being recovered by shelter workers in a neglect case. She lived at the shelter for nine months before finally being taken home by a family who wanted to take care of her.

“I see more Mountain Kerr in her than Mastiff,” Cardillo said. “When you compare her with some photos on the (internet) she looks just like some of them. She’s the Tennessee Brindle. It’s hard to believe, you know, she came in here at 27 pounds and left here at 80 pounds.”

A Federal Express driver called Cardillo nine months ago after finding a dog on Cherry Point Road in Gallia County.

“He said, ‘If you don’t come get this dog, it’s going to die,’” Cardillo said.

The dog was chained to a box at the end of a road with no food or water. She was discovered on a quiet residential property. Cardillo contacted Gallia County sheriff’s deputies and collected the animal. The officer spoke with the homeowner, who was displeased with learning that his animal had been taken.

“She looked so bad we were afraid to pick her up because we thought we would hurt her,” Cardillo said. “You could see all of her bones — her backbone, her hip bones. It was bad.”

Blossom had a benign tumor growing on her belly that anonymous souls have pledged money to have surgically removed.

Stephanie Baker came into the shelter one morning and saw Blossom after her nine-month recovery. She wound up taking home two animals that week, including Blossom.

According to Cardillo, Baker has since called the shelter back and the warden is happy to report that Blossom is taking well to the family and the children, especially given the dog’s energy and size since her recovery from starvation.

“Blossom’s a handful,” Cardillo said. “You could tie her to the bumper of a stuck truck and she’d be able to pull you clean out of the mud. Stephanie is going to have to eat Wheaties or lift weights before she can walk her.”

Shelter workers have said they will miss having Blossom at the shelter as they had grown accustomed to her.

“It’s all about the dogs” as shelter workers have commonly said, and their work never ends trying to find homes for the lost and forgotten.

Dean Wright can be reached a (740) 446-2342, Ext. 2103.

Blossom says her last goodbyes to the Gallia County Canine Shelter before being shipped home to be with her new family.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_IMG_1537.jpgBlossom says her last goodbyes to the Gallia County Canine Shelter before being shipped home to be with her new family.

By Dean Wright

[email protected]

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