Gallipolis police warn of counterfeit bills


By Dean Wright - [email protected]



Gallipolis Police Chief Jeff Boyer tells the Tribune that police believe the $100 counterfeit bills being distributed all have the same serial number of D09976348A.


GALLIPOLIS — Gallipolis Police Department advises the public and businesses to take note of the potential of $100 bills authorities have discovered being passed around the region.

According to Gallipolis Police Chief Jeff Boyer, four counterfeit bills have been discovered in Gallipolis in the last three days and authorities assume more are being distributed throughout the county. Boyer noted that bills were distributed to businesses near major highways and plazas and mini-marts.

Officers said that businesses recognized no watermarks on some of the bills and a crooked lighter edge around the outside of the bills. One bill failed an ink mark test with a counterfeit testing pen.

“People should be especially careful around this time of year with the holiday season,” Boyer said. “Lots of businesses are and shoppers are looking to get in and out and get home. It’s easy to overlook things when you’re handing over money.”

Boyer noted it was not a common occurrence in Gallia County that counterfeit bills were passed around during the holiday season. The Gallia County Chamber of Commerce announced to local businesses in August that a few $100 had been found discovered and passed about businesses.

Boyer said that individuals who felt they may have come in contact with counterfeit money should contact authorities. Every scenario would be handled on a case-by-case basis. If an individual was genuinely unaware they had counterfeit money, there is no fear of charges being pressed.

According to the United States Secret Service website, some methods for identifying fake currency relate in detail surrounding the bill’s symbols. Borders around a bill should be clear and straight. Scrollwork should not be fuzzy. Serial numbers should be evenly spaced and on the same text line. Numbers be colored the same as the national treasury seal. Paper used in U.S. currency should have tiny red and blue fibers embedded throughout it. Oftentimes, criminals will try printing these lines onto paper.

Individuals should also notice that counterfeit bills often feel differently than real bills. Counterfeit detection pens use an iodine-based ink to determine whether a bill is authentic by drawing a line across the bill surface. However, these pens are not full-proof.

For more information in how to determine whether a dollar is real or fake, visit www.sercretservice.gov/money_detect.shtml or visit your local bank.

Dean Wright can be reached at (740)446-2342, Ext. 2103.

Gallipolis Police Chief Jeff Boyer tells the Tribune that police believe the $100 counterfeit bills being distributed all have the same serial number of D09976348A.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_DSCN5316.jpgGallipolis Police Chief Jeff Boyer tells the Tribune that police believe the $100 counterfeit bills being distributed all have the same serial number of D09976348A.

By Dean Wright

[email protected]

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