Burdell farm hosts Farm City Day


By Dean Wright - [email protected]



Farm City Day comers enjoyed a variety of activities, food and demonstrations to help inspire younger generations to take an interest in the future of America’s food growth.


Dean Wright | Daily Tribune

Michael Fulks (left), 81, cooked the day’s beans in a kettle over the fire. He estimated feeding around 200 meal orders using 40 pounds of pinto beans and three pounds of ham hocks in his homemade bean concoction. He also spent time explaining the workings of vintage farm equipment like the one pictured to individuals asking about its operation. The machine pictured is a 1920s DeLaval dairy cream separator.


Dean Wright | Daily Tribune

BIDWELL — The Gallia County Soil and Water Conservation District on Saturday helped host its annual Farm City Day at the Burdell Farm on Bandy Road.

The Burdell family farm served as the event’s venue after having been named a Century Farm a few months earlier. Century farms in Ohio are recognized as having been operated by families for at least 100 years.

“Thursday night, we did an elected officials tour,” said Nick Mills, GCSWCD district program administrator. “That’s where we sent out invitations to all local, state and federal elected officials, as well as agency heads. Just so they can see what we’re doing throughout the county to promote agriculture and see what we want to showcase.”

Gallia County Commissioners made a proclamation about Farm City Day on Thursday to help celebrate the event.

“The (Burdell) farm kind of used to be a general farm. It used to focus on dairy,” Mills said. “One brother then got more into honey farming and the other became more of a beef cow farmer. They did have some dairy, but it wasn’t a traditional dairy-only farm.”

According to Mills, the event highlighted farming tools, seed and fertilizer demonstrations, tile demonstrations, a petting zoo, soil health information, a chicken coop demonstration, cover crop information, honey bee demonstrations and quilting demonstrations. Bossard Memorial Library held games and activities for children.

Martin Hash played a dulcimer for a portion of the day.

Michael Fulks displayed some of his vintage farm equipment, as well as cooked beans in an old-fashioned kettle to feed nearly 200 individuals. He detailed some of the workings of a DeLaval dairy cream separator to onlookers he had brought with him. According to him, the machine was manufactured in the early 1920s.

Free hay rides were given throughout the day and pulled about the Burdell property by various tractors.

Mills flew a radio-controlled drone around the property to demonstrate the prospective use of such technology in the future. He said farmers were looking at the potential of drone technology in helping identify diseased plants without having to travel into the middle of a field or help disperse small amounts of chemicals or fertilizers onto such plants in a more accurate fashion.

“We did (Farm City Day) for 18 years, then we had a break. We’ve done it the last four years annually,” said Erica Preston, GCSWCD education coordinator. “The purpose is to get the community out and see what an operating farm looks like and show kids especially what farming is and there is a lot to putting a meal on the table and not just going to the supermarket.”

Dean Wright can be reached at (740) 446-3424, Ext. 2103.

Farm City Day comers enjoyed a variety of activities, food and demonstrations to help inspire younger generations to take an interest in the future of America’s food growth.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_DSCN4409.jpgFarm City Day comers enjoyed a variety of activities, food and demonstrations to help inspire younger generations to take an interest in the future of America’s food growth. Dean Wright | Daily Tribune

Michael Fulks (left), 81, cooked the day’s beans in a kettle over the fire. He estimated feeding around 200 meal orders using 40 pounds of pinto beans and three pounds of ham hocks in his homemade bean concoction. He also spent time explaining the workings of vintage farm equipment like the one pictured to individuals asking about its operation. The machine pictured is a 1920s DeLaval dairy cream separator.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_DSCN4416.jpgMichael Fulks (left), 81, cooked the day’s beans in a kettle over the fire. He estimated feeding around 200 meal orders using 40 pounds of pinto beans and three pounds of ham hocks in his homemade bean concoction. He also spent time explaining the workings of vintage farm equipment like the one pictured to individuals asking about its operation. The machine pictured is a 1920s DeLaval dairy cream separator. Dean Wright | Daily Tribune

By Dean Wright

[email protected]

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