Ariel hosts John Gee tribute


The Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre on Second Avenue in Gallipolis held a tribute to historical figure and Underground Railroad Conductor John Gee Sunday with historian Elaine Armstrong telling Gee’s tale as narrator of the event. Wendell Dobbs played flute, Lora Snow played oboe, Karen Elliot played bassoon and Marsha Palmer played horn as part of The Ohio Valley Symphony Woodwind Quartet. The quilts on stage are replicas of patterns used to guide escaping slaves on the Underground Railroad.


The Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre on Second Avenue in Gallipolis held a tribute to historical figure and Underground Railroad Conductor John Gee Sunday with historian Elaine Armstrong telling Gee’s tale as narrator of the event. Wendell Dobbs played flute, Lora Snow played oboe, Karen Elliot played bassoon and Marsha Palmer played horn as part of The Ohio Valley Symphony Woodwind Quartet. The quilts on stage are replicas of patterns used to guide escaping slaves on the Underground Railroad.

The Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre on Second Avenue in Gallipolis held a tribute to historical figure and Underground Railroad Conductor John Gee Sunday with historian Elaine Armstrong telling Gee’s tale as narrator of the event. Wendell Dobbs played flute, Lora Snow played oboe, Karen Elliot played bassoon and Marsha Palmer played horn as part of The Ohio Valley Symphony Woodwind Quartet. The quilts on stage are replicas of patterns used to guide escaping slaves on the Underground Railroad.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/web1_4279-1-.jpegThe Ariel-Ann Carson Dater Performing Arts Centre on Second Avenue in Gallipolis held a tribute to historical figure and Underground Railroad Conductor John Gee Sunday with historian Elaine Armstrong telling Gee’s tale as narrator of the event. Wendell Dobbs played flute, Lora Snow played oboe, Karen Elliot played bassoon and Marsha Palmer played horn as part of The Ohio Valley Symphony Woodwind Quartet. The quilts on stage are replicas of patterns used to guide escaping slaves on the Underground Railroad.
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