Deputies discover meth lab remnants


How to recognize the signs of ‘shake and bake’ labs

By Dean Wright - [email protected]



Gallia deputies discovered the remains of a “shake and bake” meth lab on Keels Road Sunday.


GREENFIELD TOWNSHIP — Gallia deputies responded to a report Sunday from a citizen who had located the discarded remains of a meth lab on Keels Road in Greenfield Township, according to Gallia County Sheriff Matt Champlin.

“The contaminants left over from these shake and bake labs are extremely dangerous and harmful,” said Champlin, who has experience as a meth lab disposal technician. “I want our residents to be aware of what they look like and to call us immediately if they run across one because they have the potential to be very harmful to your health.”

Champlin also stated that county and state road workers along with public utility workers are especially susceptible to running across these types of discarded labs. Champlin wants to remind the public not to touch or disturb a lab, if one is discovered, and to call the Gallia County 911 Center immediately.

Champlin said in Gallia County it is typical to discover these “one-pot” lab methods. According to Champlin, the technique is often called “shake and bake.”

Potential meth dealers and users will mix a slew of chemicals together often in something like a plastic soda or sports drink bottle. Ingredients often include pseudeophedrine, drugs used in Sudafed, Coleman fuel and lithium stripped from batteries. Soda bottles will often have a hose attached to the makeshift “lab” as part of the meth creation.

“Based on everything we saw (on Keels Road), we believed (the suspect) cooked it out there and left their waste,” said Champlin. In Champlin’s over three years of being a meth lab disposal technician, he was confident in saying law enforcement had not discovered any other meth lab creation techniques discovered within Gallia County.

Bigger meth creation processes require red phosphorous and a heating source. The “shake and bake” method, according to Champlin, requires fewer chemicals, is easier to transport and typically involves less dangerous risks.

Lithium and water can still react violently in a one-pot meth creation, however, so meth creators often have to “burp” a bottle in order to relieve gas and heat buildup.

When in question as to whether one has discovered meth making devices, Champlin said it was best to call law enforcement than to handle it oneself.

Dean Wright can be reached at 74-446-2342, ext. 2103.

Gallia deputies discovered the remains of a “shake and bake” meth lab on Keels Road Sunday.
http://mydailytribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/web1_2.14-PPR-Meth.jpgGallia deputies discovered the remains of a “shake and bake” meth lab on Keels Road Sunday.
How to recognize the signs of ‘shake and bake’ labs

By Dean Wright

[email protected]

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